Cambridge-Africa

Cambridge University 'Africa'-related Links

In addition to the Cambridge-Africa Programme, there are several other programmes, Centres, Initiatives, international consortia with a Cambridge University component, Cambridge-University affiliated organisations, as well as individual Cambridge researchers, linking up with Africa! The Cambridge-Africa Programme interacts with and/ supports several of these other activities, in order to add value to and strengthen links between the University of Cambridge and our African partners. Examples of some of these other 'Africa'-related activities are provided below. Any other Cambridge University or Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researcher(s) who would like their Africa-linked projects/programmes to be listed here can complete the Notification About Africa-related Research Collaborations Form.

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From the Africa's Voices project at the Centre for Governance and Human Rights in Cambridge.

 

 

  

 

Click on the links or scroll down for more information.  

Addenbrooke's Abroad (AA) African Archaeology Group
African Art and Europe Africa Research Forum
African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS)
Africa's Voices Biosciences For Farming in Africa (B4FA)
Cambridge Arctic Shelf Programme (CASP) Cambridge Conservation Initiative (CCI)
Cambridge Executive Education Cambridge Governance Labs
Cambridge Immunology Cambridge Infectious Diseases (CID)
Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)
Cambridge University Language Centre Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (CTVT) Project
Centre for Commonwealth Education (CCE) Centre of African Studies (CAS)
Centre of Governance and Human Rights The Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Centre of Islamic Studies
Centre for Sustainable Development (CSD) Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC)
Earth Sciences (Prof Peter Leggo)
Eastern Africa Health Professionals Educators Association (EAHPEA)  
IN AFRICA Institute of Astronomy (IoA)
Institute for Infectious Diseases of Poverty (IIDP/IRMP) Institute of Manufacturing (IfM)
International Health Research Group (IHRG) Mentoring African Research in Mathematics Scheme (MARM)
Natural Materials and Structures Group Paedeatrics, Endocrinology Training Centres (PETCA)
Paediatrics, Inter-generational risk of metabolic disease Physics in Africa
The Schistosomiasis Research Group The Centre for Global Equality
Teaching and Research in Neuroscience for Development (TReND) Tropical Biology Association (TBA)
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) WHO Collaborating Centre for Modelling, Evolution and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases (WHOCC)

 

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Addenbrooke's Abroad (AA) is part of Addenbrooke's Charitable Trust, the registered charity for Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) which runs Addenbrooke's Hospital and the Rosie Hospital. AA supports staff and students of the CUH in sharing their skills and experiences with hospitals and health organisations in the developing world, to bring about positive, sustainable change in healthcare. In Africa, AA has established links with The Princess Marina Hospital in Botswana, and has helped to develop a nationwide diabetic eye disease screening project, among others. AA interacts with the Cambridge-Africa Programme on clinical/health-related issues, particularly with respect to the THRiVE Initiative and the WT-CCGHR. www.addenbrookesabroad.org.uk

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The African Archaeology Group is a discussion group that hosts regular seminars focused on African Archaeology, at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. http://www.mcdonald.cam.ac.uk/events/african-seminars

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African Art and Europe is a research area within the Department of History of Art, headed by Professor Jean Michel Massing. www.hoart.cam.ac.uk/research/western-and-non-western-cultural-exchange

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African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS): The University of Cambridge is a founding partner for AIMS, established in 2003 in Cape Town, South Africa. The goals of AIMS are to promote mathematics and science in Africa; to recruit and train talented students and teachers from all over Africa; and to build capacity for African initiatives in education, research, and technology. A number of Cambridge academics (e.g. from the DAMTP, DPMMS and the Department of Physics) lecture at AIMS, which now has campuses in other parts of Africa (e.g. in Ghana and Senegal and Cameroon). https://www.aims.ac.za/

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The Africa Research Forum is an interdisciplinary discussion group for postgraduate students, visiting academics, and Cambridge University faculty members working on Africa-related topics. http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/events2/archive/arf2

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Africa's Voices is a non-profit research organisation spun out of the University of Cambridge. They leverage new opportunities of the digital revolution to converse with and listen to African citizens. In interactive, local language media forums they spark inclusive discussions and invite audience opinions via new technologies, including SMS and social media. They analyse this digital, citizen-generated data using multi-disciplinary techniques. http://www.africasvoices.org/

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Biosciences For Farming in Africa (B4FA): This is a programme specifically designed to encourage informed discussion about the potential application of biosciences and genetics for farming in Africa. The aim is to encourage dialogue and promote a better understanding of the available options for improving agricultural productivity in four African countries – Ghana, Tanzania, Nigeria and Uganda.The key question being asked is 'Can recent advances help bring about a positive change on farms and in communities in Africa and create a vibrant, sustainable and diverse agricultural sector?' A change that would also mean Africa could play a role in helping feed the world. Professor Sir Brian Heap  (Project Leader) is based in Cambridge and was formerly Master of St Edmund’s College, Cambridge. Dr David Bennett (Project co-Leader) is a Visitor at St Edmund’s College in Cambridge. www.b4fa.org/

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Cambridge Arctic Shelf Programme (CASP) is a not-for-profit charitable trust carrying out field, literature and analysis-based geological research in prospective hydrocarbon basins. Funding comes entirely from subscriptions by the oil and gas industry. Subscribers to CASP projects receive regular confidential reports and updates. The results of their research are published in internationally renowned peer-reviewed scientific journals. Some of their research is conducted in Libya, North Africa. www.casp.cam.ac.uk/

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The Cambridge Conservation Initiative (CCI) is a unique collaboration between the University of Cambridge and leading biodiversity conservation organisations in and around Cambridge, UK. They seek to transform the global understanding and conservation of biodiversity and the natural capital it represents and, through this, secure a sustainable future for all life on Earth. Several of their researchers collaborate with African researchers. www.conservation.cam.ac.uk

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Cambridge Executive Education: They design programmes for organisations, business professionals, managers, leaders, and executives from many different functions, who strive for professional and personal growth. Their programmes are developed to help executives and organisations from both the private and the public sectors achieve operational excellence and results. Cambridge Executive Education has a growing list of clients and potential clients from Africa, and could support many more. https://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/execed/

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Cambridge Governance Labs is a new interdisciplinary initiative (based at Hughes Hall) to promote good governance in developing countries. It does so by focusing on decision-making and the factors that enhance or degrade decision-making capability. Good governance relies on sound decisions and the right balance of power between society and its leaders. By equipping citizens and leaders alike to make better decisions, we seek to enhance productivity, reduce conflict and empower stakeholders to work more harmoniously towards common social and development objectives. International cross-disciplinary events will bring together academics and practitioners from across the University and beyond. Research and event findings will then be translated into practical tools to be tested in pilot projects in Africa and made freely available online and through publications. www.governancelabs.org

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Cambridge Immunology: A virtual focus for the community of immunologists working in and around Cambridge. It builds on a rich tradition of immunological research in Cambridge, and brings together a diverse range of groups. There is interaction between this initiative and MUII, for linking up with African researchers. www.immunology.cam.ac.uk

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Cambridge Infectious Diseases (CID): Infectious disease research represents a priority area at the University of Cambridge. It is therefore important that mechanisms are put in place to ensure that the broad range of research (e.g. from fundamental biological research through to the development of new drugs, as well as understanding the history of infectious diseasesa range of research efforts) can be coordinated to achieve synergies between different departments and areas of expertise. The CID Strategic Initiative is able to ensure this coordination by promoting and facilitating all forms of infectious disease research at the University of Cambridge, including interdisciplinary efforts, together with the associated training and capacity building. The Cambridge-Africa Programme works closely with the CID through through THRiVE and the WHO Collaborating Centre for Modelling, Evolution and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases. We also partnered with CID for the successful bid for the University of Cambridge to become a Wellcome Trust Centre for Global Health Research. www.infectiousdisease.cam.ac.uk

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Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) is the world’s largest provider of international education programmes and qualifications for 5 to 19 year olds. It is as a division of Cambridge Assessment, a department of the University of Cambridge and a not-for-profit organisation and has a number of Cambridge representatives in various locations around the world, with a dedicated team for the Sub-Saharan Africa. www.cie.org.uk/about-us/our-regional-teams/sub-saharan-africa

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Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL): The CISL is working to build the leadership capacity necessary to tackle critical global challenges, and their mission is to deepen leaders’ understanding of the social, environmental and economic context in which they operate and help them to respond in ways that benefit their organisations, governments and society as a whole. The CISL has offices in Cambridge, Brussels and Cape Town (South Africa) and are therefore able to deliver Africa-related projects on the ground in Cambridge and Africa. As an example, the CISL was commissioned to run a training programme in Cambridge to integrate climate change issues into the African Development Bank’s existing policies and operations, to enable the Bank to deliver its vision of Inclusive and Green development in Africa (as outlined in their new Ten Year Strategy).http://www.cisl.cam.ac.uk

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The Cambridge University Language Centre has resources in some 170 languages in its open access learning centre, and provides support to Cambridge University students and staff who request a range of African languages, including Oromo and Twi. They can acquire more resources in response to demand and interest. The Centre's CULP programme offers a taught Swahili language course for students and staff of the University. www.langcen.cam.ac.uk/culp.

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The Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (CTVT) Project aims to to understand the origins, evolution and disease dynamics of CTVT, which is one of only two known naturally occurring transmissible cancers. CTVT is transmitted by the transfer of living cancer cells between individual dogs and it is a very prevalent disease worldwide, especially in many developing countries. We collaborate with veterinarians all around the world including a number of African countries (Cape Verde, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, The Gambia and Uganda). Our lab is led by Dr Elizabeth Murchison and we are based at the Department of Veterinary Medicine. Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (CTVT) Project

The Centre for Commonwealth Education (CCE) (based in the Faculty of Education) aims to make a vibrant and long term contribution to primary and secondary education, and to initial and continuing teacher education in countries of the Commonwealth. In addition to hosting international visitors and organising seminars and conferences, the Centre has several on-going initiatives in East, West and Southern Africa, in areas such as gender equity in education in East Africa, planning for leadership and learning in Ghana, ICT use in Zambian primary education, and the learning and teaching of southern African poetry. More information about these initiatives is available at www.educ.cam.ac.uk/centres/cce/. There is significant interaction between the CCE and the Cambridge-Africa Programme, particularly through CAPREx and the Alborada Research Fund.

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The Centre of African Studies (CAS) is part of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Cambridge. The Centre supports teaching on Africa at the University of Cambridge, through its library and seminar series. It also acts as a platform for interdisciplinary research, bringing the University's Africanists together with scholars from African, American, and European universities. With support from the Leverhulme Trust and the Isaac Newton Trust, the CAS currently hosts the Cambridge/Africa Collaborative Research Programme. Since 2007, this scheme has elected five African scholars as Visiting Fellows of CAS every year, supporting their work with Cambridge academics, facilitating academic and intellectual exchange, and establishing a framework for longer-term partnerships between Cambridge and African universities. There is significant interaction between the CAS and the Cambridge-Africa Programme, particularly through the CAPREx initiative. www.african.cam.ac.uk/index.html.

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The Centre of Governance and Human Rights draws together experts, practitioners and policymakers from Cambridge University and beyond to think critically and innovatively about governance and human rights issues throughout the world. The Centre has a particular focus on Africa, hosting research projects including Africa's Voices, Politics and Interactive Media in Africa, and New communications technologies and citizen-led governance in Africa. http://www.cghr.polis.cam.ac.uk

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The Centre of Islamic Studies: The Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Centre of Islamic Studies aims to promote a constructive and critical understanding of the role of Islam and Muslims in wider society. Although focused on the UK and Europe, the Centre also has current and emerging links with Africa. www.cis.cam.ac.uk

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Centre for Sustainable Development (CSD): The Centre for Sustainable Development in the Cambridge University Engineering Department was established in 2000, following support provided by the Royal Academy of Engineering, to introduce concepts of sustainability over all our undergraduate engineering courses. http://www-http://www-csd.eng.cam.ac.uk/themes0

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The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC): Professor James Wood, a key member of the Cambridge-Africa Programme Committee, together with other partners in the UK and Africa, were awarded a £3.2m grant to set up a research consortium exploring the connections between ecosystems, health and poverty in Africa. DDDAC enabled zoologists to work with other natural scientists as well as a range of social scientists (including anthropologists, economists and geographers) in an integrated approach, to understand zoonoses diseases which pass from animals to humans, in Africa. https://steps-centre.org/project/drivers_of_disease/

Earth Sciences: Professor Peter Leggo of the Department of Earth Sciences in Cambridge is evaluating the properties and benefits of using an organo-zeolitic fertilizer (bio-fertilizer) for the production of biofuel and or food crops on contaminated and marginal land. Together with Dr Simon R. Passey (a geologist with CASP - a geological organisation which is affiliated with the Department of Earth Sciences), and Dr Dereje Ayalew (of the Faculty of Science at the University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia), their research work has supplied rocks from the North West Highlands of Ethiopia. These rocks contain minerals which are used together with organic waste to make a very effective plant fertilizer. Dr Ayalew has a background in Ethiopian geology, and intends to develop the use of the biological further, with the help of the local farming community. 

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The Eastern Africa Health Professionals Educators Association (EAHPEA) has been formed to provide an open forum for ALL health educators to share, support, inspire, identify needs, develop capacity and foster scholarship. The EAHPEA is supported by a range of health professionals and partnered by Anglia Ruskin University. The Cambridge contact person is Arthur Hibble (arthur.hibble@anglia.ac.uk), senior member at Hughes Hall, Cambridge, and Associate Lecturer at the General Practice & Primary Care Research Unit (Department of Public Health & Primary Care, Institute of Public Health), University of Cambridge. sites.google.com/site/eamededucators/.

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Human Nutrition Research: Dr Ann Prentice's (Director at MRC Human Nutrition Research (HNR), Head of the Nutrition and Bone Health Group, University of Cambridge) research focuses on nutrient requirements for bone health, encompassing the nutritional problems of both affluent and developing societies. She is currently involved in projects studying pregnant and lactating women, children, adolescents and older people in the UK, West Africa, Bangladesh, South Africa and China. http://www.mrc-ewl.cam.ac.uk/people/ann-prentice/

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IN AFRICA is a five-year research programme to investigate the origins of our species - Homo sapiens - and its diversity in Africa, and aims to make new discoveries of early human fossils, archaeological sites and their environmental context in East Africa, to test models of human origins and diversification in Africa. Project collaborators include academics from the Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies at the University of Cambridge's Department of Archaeology & Anthropology, and also the Department of Geography. A University of Cambridge feature about this programme is available at www.cam.ac.uk/research/features/beachcombing-for-early-humans-in-africa. The main programme website is in-africa.org. Members of the Cambridge team are also part of the charity EJOK, which intends to build a class room in Turkana in rural Kenya, where thier research is being conducted.

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Institute of Astronomy (IoA): Professor Alec Boksenberg of the IoA is promoting the development of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project with its main sites in South Africa (involving eight African partner countries) and Australia. The SKA will be the world's largest and most sensitive radio telescope and among the biggest international scientific projects to date; construction is due to be completed in 2023. At least 13 countries and close to 100 organisations are already involved, and more are joining the project. The scientific aims are sighted on the origin and development of the Universe and the astronomical data collected by the SKA in a single day would take nearly two million years to play back on an ipod. Professor Boksenberg is also on the Board of The Future University, a newly established (2011) private university in Khartoum, Sudan. The Future University is strongly focused on science and technology. Interestingly, almost 50% of its 2,000 students are women. At this University Professor Boksenberg would like to support capacity building in basic sciences, as well as collaborative research in energy production and water usage.

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Institute for Infectious Diseases of Poverty (IIDP/IRMP) is a consortium of Anglophone and Francophone West African Institutions with a mission to develop the infrastructure required for the production of the high quality interdisciplinary science necessary to address the problems of infectious diseases of poverty. Hughes Hall in Cambridge is a partner in this Wellcome Trust-funded African Institutions Initiative.http://www.riidp.org/?q=About

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Institute of Manufacturing (IfM): Dr Dennis Lewis, a Principal Industrial Fellow with Educational and Consultancy Services at the IfM, which is part of the School of Engineering, applies IfM research output to support strategy and capability development for industrial corporations. He has a portfolio career following Board, General Management and Global Supply Chain experience with Unilever and is a Non-Executive Director with Africa Matters Limited: a private sector company which is passionate about making a sustainable difference in Africa by supporting and enabling responsible private sector investment in the continent. For more information please go to www.africamatters.com.

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International Health Research Group (IHRG) assesses the burden and aetiology of infectious and non-communicable diseases among populations. They have a strong interest in exploring epidemiological transitions in low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Their approach integrates principles and procedures underlying epidemiology, genomics and public health. www.phpc.cam.ac.uk/ncd/.

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Mentoring African Research in Mathematics (MARM) Scheme: The London Mathematical Society (LMS), the International Mathematical Union (IMU), and the African Mathematics Millennium Science Initiative (AMMSI) are partners in the MARM scheme. MARM is funded by the Nuffield Foundation, to support mathematics and its teaching in countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It focuses on cultivating longer-term mentoring relations between individual mathematicians and students. This is achieved by the creation of joint research partnerships between UK mathematicians, their colleagues in sub-Saharan Africa, and doctoral students of those colleagues. Some Cambridge University researchers are mentors for this scheme. https://www.lms.ac.uk/grants/mentoring-african-research-mathematics

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Natural Materials and Structures Group, led by Michael Ramage, the group focuses on adapting natural materials and traditional methods to contemporary architecture. It revisits natural materials and traditional typologies, to innovate new natural material composites and designs for affordable and sustainable building systems in developing countries, including those in Africa. Mr Ramage and his team form the EcoHouse Research, a branch of the EcoHouse Initiative, charged with the task of driving the academic research element of projects. With extensive experience in development with low-income communities, the team has created a knowledge exchange platform to facilitate dialogue between communities and researchers, matching community needs with research interests, thereby enlarge social impact by ensuring relevance of research to the community.

The EcoHouse Research team has been working on a project under the UN-Habitat-coordinated Global Network for Sustainable Housing (GNSH). They aim to build a community centre in the heart of this impoverished area in Nairobi, using a model that makes the community’s involvement central to the process – participatory design. It is hoped that the project will provide a scalable model for future projects with other communities and institutions.

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Mr Michael Ramage is a member of the Cambridge-Africa Programme Committee.

Paediatric ResearchPaediatric Endocrinology Training Centres for Africa ( PETCA): The European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) together with the International Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) recognised the need for paediatricians in Africa to be supported in developing subspecialty training in the care of children and adolescents with endocrine problems. The Paediatric Endocrinology Training Centres for Africa (PETCA) Programme was started in 2008 with a centre in Nairobi for East and Sub-Saharan Africa. A second centre for West Africa (PETCWA) was established in Lagos in 2012. The programme lasts 18 months, comprising a residential 6 month course at the centre, followed by 9 months at the student’s home institution when undertaking a research project, followed by a further 3 months revision course back at the centre and ending with an examination.About 6-10 students are enrolled in each group where teaching is based on lectures, seminars, case presentations, supervised clinics at different hospitals and detailed student presentations of their intended research projects. The course of instruction is underpinned by arranging a cast of international tutors to visit the centres for 2-4 weeks every 2 months to provide hands on supervision as well as guidance electronically throughout the course in supervising progress with the research projects. Local supervisors also contribute to the course, some of whom are now graduates of the early courses. The coordination of providing a tutor Faculty is the responsibility of Ieuan Hughes, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Cambridge (iah1000@cam.ac.uk). More than 50 students have now graduated from the course. In turn, there is now an African Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Endocrinology established which holds annual scientific meetings in different African countries each year.

The programmes in Nairobi and Lagos are currently being assessed by the Universities of Nairobi and Lagos, respectively, for the awarding of formal academic qualifications for the graduates of the programme. Cambridge has assisted with planning the curriculum and assessment process to ensure they meet the required standards of the two Universities. An important marker of the success and standing of the course is the number of publications resulting from the research projects undertaken by the students. This illustrates that some of the graduates would certainly benefit from being considered for the PhD programme currently being developed by the Cambridge-Africa Programme.

Paediatric Research: Inter-generational risk of metabolic disease, MRC, "Health and wellbeing of female adolescents and young adults, and their infants; limiting the inter-generational risk of metabolic disease in South Africa": Professor David Dunger (Head of the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Cambridge) is the Principal Investigator for this MRC/DFID African Research Leader (ARL) scheme, which has Professor Shane Norris (University of Witwatersrand, South Africa) as the ARL. More information about the research collaboration is available at http://www.mrc.ac.uk/funding/science-areas/global-health/arl/

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Physics in Africa: Researchers at the Cavendish Laboratory, led by Professor Paul Alexander, have a key role in the Square Kilometre Array Radio Telescope (SKA) astronomy project in South Africa (see www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/work-begins-on-worlds-most-powerful-radio-telescope and www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/paper-array-positioning-karoo-as-key-site-for-study-of-cosmos-2013-05-10). This project, which is active now, is a precursor to the SKA -the largest astronomy project at the moment: www.skatelescope.org/media-outreach/news/. Dr Andy Parker (Head of Department)'s particle physics project, ATLAS (atlas.ch) also has collaborators from Johannesburg and Witwatersrand in South Africa. Furthermore, Dr Eileen Nugent (a Lecturer at the Department of Physics) also conducts Physics outreach work in Malawi.  :

Public Health at Cambridge: The PublicHealth@Cambridge network is a multi-disciplinary community for public health research across Cambridge.The network was established to link and promote research activities among the broad academic research community in Cambridge which includes members of all six Schools of the University and a number of key regional partner organisations. The goal is to generate fresh insight into the health and well-being of populations by establishing a multidisciplinary community of researchers; supporting development of new research and co-ordinated activities in areas of importance to public health; and facilitating translation of research to benefit current and future populations. Joining the PublicHealth@Cambridge Network is free and is open to Cambridge-based researchers, at any level of their career, with an interest in research relating to public health. The online researcher directory allows people to search for Cambridge public health network members with interests or expertise in particular areas.

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The Schistosomiasis Research Group (based at the Department of Pathology) is headed by Professor David Dunne. The group has been conducting field-based research on human schistosomiasis in disease endemic rural areas of Africa for over 30 years, and has been instrumental in understanding the debilitating, sometimes fatal, parasitic worm infection. The group has long-term partnerships with colleagues in Uganda, Kenya and Mali, and more recently collaborations in Ghana, Gabon, and Tanzania too. Current studies in the group concurrently focus on the induction, regulation and outcomes of IgE responses on schistosomiasis, hookworm infections and allergic disease in schistosomiasis endemic countries. Funding for the Schistosomiasis programme is at present obtained from the European Commission and the Wellcome Trust. Professor Dunne is also the Director of the Wellcome Trust-Cambridge Centre for Global Health Research, and the Cambridge-Africa Programme. http://www.schisto.path.cam.ac.uk/

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The Centre for Global Equality is an international development network that connects people working in academia, industry, government and civil society to develop more effective ways of working together to tackle global poverty and inequality. They are affiliated with the University of Cambridge, and work closely with the Cambridge-Africa Programme (particularly with respect to global health, and global food security issues). http://centreforglobalequality.org/

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TReND (Teaching and Research in Neuroscience for Development) in Africa is a non-profit organisation dedicated to improving university level science education and research in sub-Saharan Africa. TReND seeks to foster scientific excellence and collaboration in Africa through a range of educational initiatives. These include the organisation of an intensive insect neuroscience course for young African scientists annually, bringing in internationally renowned scientists as instructors. TReNDalso  encourages researchers to organise similar summer schools on other topics. They also coordinate equipment donations to African institutions. Additionally they have an academic programme that gives the oportunity to western researchers to spend some months teaching and conducting research at an African institution. TReND was set up by researchers from the University of Cambridge, and has always had the support of the THRiVE Programme in Cambridge (and now, the wider Cambridge-Africa Programme). Although some of the key founding members have now left Cambridge, there are still researchers from the Department of Zoology in Cambridge who contribute to teaching for this annual course in Uganda. A University of Cambridge article about how Cambridge researchers are contributing to this organisation is available at www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/on-the-fly-summer-school-in-africa-teaches-insect-neuroscience. The organisation's website is trendinafrica.org/.

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The Tropical Biology Association (TBA), established in 1993, is is a non-governmental, non-profit organisation working in partnership with environmental institutions in Africa. The association provides practical training (field courses, specialist skills workshops and applied research) to conservation biologists and practitioners who have the potential to impact on biodiversity management and research in Africa significantly. TBA also provides information (e.g. for funding), resources and opportunities for networking between African and European conservation biologists. The European Office for TBA, and the Director of TBA (Dr Rosie Trevelyan) are located in the Department of Zoology at the University of Cambridge. http://www.tropical-biology.org/.

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The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI): This is a charitably-funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, a few miles south of Cambridge, UK. The WTSI is affiliated with the University of Cambridge as a 'Non-University Institution.  members of WTSI researchers are members of the Cambridge-Africa Committee, and several researchers from the WTSI have joined our register of potential mentors for African (particularly THRiVE) fellows. Some WTSI researchers were also awarded grants by the Cambridge-Africa Alborada Research Fund, to collaborate with African researchers as well as being Co-PIs for the WT-CCGHRhttp://www.sanger.ac.uk/

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WHO Collaborating Centre for Modelling, Evolution and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases (WHOCC): the University of Cambridge received designation as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre in 2012. This designation was primarily in recognition and support of the contribution to public health by the Centre for Pathogen Evolution, in the Department of Zoology. The Cambridge-Africa Programme is now linking up with the WHOCC, to enable the Cambridge researchers to network with our African collaborators/partners and help to develop African research capacity. One example of how the Cambridge-Africa Programme and the WHO Collaborating Centre in Cambridge work together is the connection of dengue virus researchers across Africa (e.g. in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Sudan). Through networking and sharing of information, this project is characterising the antigenic and genetic variation in dengue viruses across the African continent, assessing how effectively current vaccine candidates might protect against dengue strains circulating in Africa, and increasing surveillance. Another outcome is to integrate the priorities of African researchers for the study of dengue viruses with the objectives of the global dengue antigenic cartography project. www.whocc.infectiousdisease.cam.ac.uk/

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