Cambridge-Africa

Researchers' Database

Researchers from across the University of Cambridge and its affiliated institutes are engaging with the initiatives of the Cambridge-Africa Programme by carrying out collaborative research with African colleagues, and/or mentoring African fellows.

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Photograph:

Dr Annettee Nakimuli, Makerere University and MUII PhD Fellow, and her Cambridge co-supervisor Professor Ashley Moffett, Department of Pathology.

 

 

 

In order to recruit excellent post-doctoral researchers and doctoral students from Africa into Cambridge for training, we have built (and are continuously expanding) a database of current and potential Cambridge collaborators/mentors and their expertise. The >180 Cambridge researchers listed are either already engaging with, or have indicated their interest in being matched to Africans who have similar research interests. Cambridge researchers who would like to get involved do not need to have a pre-prepared project available, or existing African links, in order to be included in the database. If you would like your details to be included, please complete the (short and painless) registration form.

Note to African researchers searching for a Cambridge collaborator: Please be aware that any enquiries about potential collaboration with a Cambridge researcher need to be directed to one of the Cambridge-Africa Programme staff  or enquiries@cambridge-africa.cam.ac.uk in the first instance. They will then put you in touch with the Cambridge researcher if there is an appropriate match in the research interests. Thanks for your cooperation.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Dr Florence Nabwire (Nutrition) More Info

Position & Affiliation:
Investigator Scientist

Research Interests:

Maternal and child nutrition, calcium, vitamin D and bone health in the context of HIV/AIDS/resource limited settings.

Dr Sergey Nejentsev (Genetics Of Tuberculosis) More Info

Position & Affiliation:
Royal Society Research Fellow, Dept of Medicine
http://tb.med.cam.ac.uk/

Research Interests:

Genetics of susceptibility to tuberculosis. Host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis.

Publications:
(1) Szeszko JS et al. Resequencing and association analysis of the SP110 gene in adult pulmonary tuberculosis. Hum Genet 121(2): 155, 2007.

(2) Nejentsev S et al. Analysis of association of the TIRAP (MAL) S180L variant and tuberculosis in three populations. Nat Genet 40(3): 261, 2008.

Dr Sarah Nouwen (Law, Politics, War and peace,) More Info

Position & Affiliation:
Lecturer in Law, Fellow of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, Fellow of Pembroke College
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/people/academic/smh-nouwe...

Research Interests:

Sarah’s research interests lie at the intersections of law & politics, war & peace and justice & the rule of law.

 

Current African links:
In Uganda (Refugee Law Project)
In Sudan
With the African Union

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=428969

Publications:
“Complementarity in the Line of Fire: The Catalysing Effect of the International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan”, Cambridge Series in Law and Society, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, and Cambridge Africa Collection, Cambridge University Press, Cape Town, 2013

“Doing Justice to the Political: The International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan”, 21(4) European Journal of International Law (2010) 941-965, with W. Werner

Dr Eileen Nugent (Microfluidic Platforms for Molecular Biology Research) More Info

Position & Affiliation:
Lu Gwei Djen Research Fellow, Cavendish Laboratory Cambridge, Lucy Cavendish College

Research Interests:

I am interested in developing microfluidic platforms for investigation of
fundamental biological questions such as (a) the role of DNA structure in global
regulation of gene expression (b) the influence of mechanical constraints on cell growth.
I also apply these platforms to study infection processes in diseases such as Malaria.

Possible projects/topics
Malarial infection dynamics in microfluidic environments

Current African links
Institute of Physics International Coordinator for Malawi

Dr Meritxell Nus Chimeno (Interaction malnutrition-gut microbiota-T follicular helper cellss) More Info

Position & Affiliation:
Senior Postdoctoral Researcher, Dept. of Medicine, University of Cambridge
https://www.cardiovascular.cam.ac.uk/directory/mer...

Research Interests:

Immunology: adaptive immune response Nutrition: malnutrition, lipids Gut microbiota

Publications:
Nus M, Sage AP, LuY, Masters L, LamBYH, NewlandS, TsiantoulasD, RaffortJ, Finigan A, KittL, FiggN, SchirmbeckR, KneillingM, YeoGSH, BinderC, de la PompaJL, Mallat Z. Marginal zone B cells control follicular helper T cell response to high cholesterol diet (Nat Med 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4315)

Nus M, Martínez-Poveda B, Macgrogan D, Chevre R, D´Amato G, Sbroggio M, Rodriguez C, Martínez-Gonzalez J, Vicente A, Hidalgo A, de la Pompa JL. Endothelial Notch signaling is required for the NF-kB driven inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. Cardiovasc Res 2016; epub August.

Nus M, MacGrogan D, Martínez-Poveda B, Benito Y, Casanova JC, Fernández-Avilés F, Bermejo J, de la Pompa JL. Diet-induced aortic valve disease in mice haploinsufficient for the Notch pathway effector RBPJK/CSL. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2011; 31:1580-8

Dr Mukanthu Nyirenda (Immunology-related projects, particularly Tuberculosis, HIV, Malaria and Diabetes) More Info

Position & Affiliation:
Postdoc Research Associate, Department of Clinical Neurosciences

Research Interests:

My current research focuses on defining disease-specific T cell subsets in multiple sclerosis (MS) in order to allow the development of highly specific therapies in MS. During my postdoc at McGill University in Canada, I found that MAIT and CD4+CCR5+CD161+ T cell subsets are involved in the immunopathogenesis of MS. Preliminary work show that these T cell subsets are also important in diabetes and infectious diseases, including Tuberculosis, HIV and Malaria.

Publications:
TLR2 stimulation regulates the balance between regulatory T cell and Th17 function: a novel mechanism of reduced regulatory T cell function in multiple sclerosis. 2015; doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1400472

TLR2 stimulation drives human naive and effector regulatory T cells into a Th17-like phenotype with reduced suppressive function. 2011; doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1003715

Mycobacterium tuberculosis resides in nonacidified vacuoles in endocytically competent alveolar macrophages from patients with tuberculosis and HIV infection. 2004; PMID: 15034077